Christian Louboutin Shoes : Pleasure and Pain” offers a history lesson of change

 

“What spirit is so empty and blind, that it cannot recognize the fact that the foot is more noble than the shoe, and skin more beautiful than the garment with which it is clothed?” —Michelangelo.Michelangelo’s consternation over humankind’s inclination to gild the lily was perfectly rational. But if there has been a silver lining to the dull sensibilities that propel us to tamper with perfection, it would have to be the breadth and depth of our shoe game.

SCAD FASH Museum of Fashion + Film’s Shoes replica: Pleasure and Pain opened last week (April 11–August 13), and the nearly 300-piece collection offers a history lesson of humanity — as told by our footwear.Darlings of the show include Princess Diana’s shoe lasts, David Beckham’s soccer cleats and the Swarovski crystal slippers featured in Disney’s 2015 feature film Cinderella.The exhibition was organized by London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and curated by Helen Persson, a specialist in Chinese textiles and dress.

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“Throughout the centuries and across cultures, footwear has symbolized high social status,” says Persson. “The design of christian louboutin shoes has created many identifiable symbols of supremacy and privilege, from the red heels of the French King Louis XIV’s court to the red soles of Christian Louboutin today, to show that christian louboutin outlet uk the wearer belongs to an exclusive circle.”Three centuries after the Sun King’s entourage enjoyed apparent power by taking style cues from their monarch, status-conscious consumers today are apt to follow in the footsteps of models and actresses — allowing the wearer to “live the dream of a glamorous, extravagant lifestyle, or at least pretend for an evening,” according to Persson.

From Manolo Blahnik’s “Campari” Mary Jane pointy toe pumps, the urban shoe myth that set Carrie Bradshaw’s heart aflutter in Sex & the City, to Vivienne Westwood’s blue platforms, made infamous after Naomi Campbell fell from their spectacular height on a catwalk,christian louboutin Shoes replica: Pleasure and Pain offers close encounters with everything from the sublime to the ludicrous.

The show is grouped around five themes: “Transformation,” “Status,” “Seduction,” “Creation” and “Obsession.” Historic fashion illustrations, designers’ sketches and shoemaking materials will help visitors gain a deeper understanding of the exhibition’s themes. An interactive tactile display called “Touching the Sole” will allow visually impaired guests to engage with replicas of many of the shoes replica on display. And SCAD FASH’s Film Salon will feature Vivienne Westwood: Dress Up Story, a film that was commissioned by the college in 2015.

Ancient Egyptian slippers embellished with gold leaf; a pair of botas tribaleras, a highly stylized cowboy boot from Mexico with toes that are so elongated the wearer must hold the tips to keep from tripping over them; and Zaha Hadid’s cutting-edge “Nova” cantilevered heels span nearly two millennia of shoe design.

“What I discovered is that form and material has almost always preceded function for christian louboutin shoes,” says Persson. “Even christian louboutin shoes that claim to be ergonomic usually have rounded or square toes — not reflecting the actual, angled arrangement of the toes and further emphasizing cheap christian louboutin for sale that the aesthetically pleasing has nothing to do with the practical and functional. Comfortable and practical shoes replica (also called ugly shoes) seem generally in all cultures to connote working class, poor and old people who no longer are ‘in the game.’”

Rafael Gomes, SCAD’s director of fashion exhibitions, says that even the sound of a shoe can offer aural clues about the wearer, sight unseen. “Just think of the tick-tick-tick of high heels or the slap of a flip-flop, and the very different mental images they conjure in your mind,” he says. To emphasize the point, he takes an 18th-century sabot, a whole foot wooden clog associated with the lower classes in France and Belgium from the 16th to 19th centuries, from its perch in the “Touching the Sole” section, and taps it against a shelf. “Very poor people wore this clog because they could not afford finer materials like leather,” says Gomes. “Back then, the clop-clop-clop was the sound of poverty.”